MSVU Social Media Course Blog

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How do you define success?

And then there was one- one final post on course related material. The final reading, Social media ROI- a calculator for not for profit campaigns gave us four steps for building ROI models for online communities. In light of what I’ve learned through applied learning in our client project, one step in particular really resonated with me: Identify what success looks like in the online community.

I believe that success in the online community is not necessarily all about dollar bills. Of course, this is all relative to your client’s brand recognition. If, for example, your client is virtually unknown, then it’s unrealistic to expect online users to give to your client’s cause. I know this sounds commonsensical, but so many not for profits nowadays are jumping on the social media bandwagon because, well, everyone else is doing it.  However, without an existing online presence, worthy causes risk sounding like disreputable beggars. Too harsh?

  Success in the online community is similar to campaigning for voter support. If you do not first promote yourself, your platform and what you stand for, you simply are not going to receive the riding support needed to win the campaign. Similarly, without an online presence, social capital and established relationships with people of similar interests and beliefs, then you are not going to get the kinds of funds needed to make a decent ROI. Thus, success can also be defined as establishing a network of like-minded individuals, cheerleaders if you will, you believe in your cause, so much so, that they are compelled to take action.  As some of you have already indicated, social media may not be the greatest way to raise funds, yet is effective in generating cause awareness. Essentially, it’s all in how your not for profit defines success.  Awareness and brand recognition where none existed before is pretty darn successful in my eyes.

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June 20, 2009 Posted by | Comment on Course Material, Really Relevant Interesting Stuff | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Get Up, Stand Up: Stand up for Your Rights!

Online privacy issues have dominated the news both nationally and internationally for the past few weeks. Coverage has ranged from Bill IP21C (Way to represent Matt!) to Iran’s chokehold on civilian Internet access. Since Papyrusnews.com hasn’t updated since May 24 (Seriously, guys, get with it!), I’ve decided to blog about what these issues mean for us as users. I’ve also thrown a light article in to the mix to help validate a few of my points.

So, as the story goes, the city of Bozeman, Mont., has invoked a human resources requirement that has job applicants forking over tons of personal information. The requirements include, but are not limited to, “…any and all, current personal or business websites, web pages or memberships on any Internet-based chat rooms, social clubs or forums, to include, but not limited to: Facebook, Google, Yahoo, YouTube.com, MySpace, etc.” The etc. here includes email passwords by the way!

Bozeman Attorney Greg Sullivan defended the requirements in the media, stating that a number of the positions (Police, Fire, lifeguards) require people of “high integrity.” So, they conduct these types of investigations to “make sure the people that we hire have the highest moral character and are a good fit for the city.”

While I admire the effort this city is going to ensure it has the finest town council possible, I feel that it’s a tad ludicrous. I mean, it’s a bit like allowing your employer to snoop around in your underwear drawer. Sure, the town would like upstanding citizens to serve the municipality, but where does it end in regards to background checks? It is really necessary to have access to personal email and websites? When did the disclaimer “this is not a reflection of XYZ organization“ expire? Did Bozeman miss the memo that grants civil liberties to ALL, and not just those outside of civil service?

For me, all of this dialogue around state officials demanding personal information and pushing bills that allow authorities to take personal information from ISPs is a blatant violation of the constitutional amendment. Are we shifting toward a communist type approach to Internet governance? Are we moving toward a state-run-media like China?

Just Friday, it was reported in the New York Times that the Chinese government had ordered Google to take down its Google Suggest application because it gave search results with “suggestive implications.” Alike their Iranian counterparts, Chinese computer users are also outraged by such government censorship. What’s more, the Chinese government has also announced plans to “force computer makers to install Internet censorship software on all computers sold in China after July 1.”

Again, I get that there are good intentions behind these outlandish requests, such as limiting pornography, but aren’t adults capable of making their own choices as to what they should or should not view?

My dear colleagues, it seems that sadly, our privacy is being threatened, and that the line between being secure and being invaded is incredibly blurred. My hope is that our friends in Iran and China continue to fight for their online rights, and that we Canadians blogg and tweet like nobodies business to have our online voice heard- we will NOT be silenced!

June 20, 2009 Posted by | Comment on Course Material, Really Relevant Interesting Stuff, Review of Monitored Site | , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments